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Epping, New Hampshire

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Title: Epping, New Hampshire  
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Subject: Sports in New England, Raymond, New Hampshire, List of cities and towns in New Hampshire, New Hampshire, New England Dragway
Collection: Towns in New Hampshire, Towns in Rockingham County, New Hampshire
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Epping, New Hampshire

Town of Epping
Town
Official seal of Town of Epping
Seal
Nickname(s): Home of Three Governors
"The Center of the Universe"
Coordinates:
Country United States
State New Hampshire
County Rockingham
Incorporated 1741
Government
 • Board of Selectmen Michael Yergeau
Tom Dwyer
James McGeough
Tom Gauthier
Bob Jordan
Area
 • Total 26.2 sq mi (67.9 km2)
 • Land 26.0 sq mi (67.4 km2)
 • Water 0.2 sq mi (0.5 km2)
Elevation 157 ft (48 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 6,411
 • Density 240/sq mi (94/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 03042
Area code(s) 603
FIPS code 33-24660
GNIS feature ID 0873591
Website .com.townofeppingwww

Epping is a town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 6,411 at the 2010 census.[1] Epping includes the area known as Camp Hedding.

The primary settlement in town, where 1,681 people resided at the 2010 census,[1] is defined by the U.S. Census Bureau as the Epping census-designated place (CDP) and includes the densely populated portion of the town centered on New Hampshire Route 27 just west of New Hampshire Route 125.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Culture 2
  • Geography 3
  • Demographics 4
    • Town center 4.1
  • Sites of interest 5
  • Notable people 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

History

Bird's-eye View in 1906

The town was originally part of Exeter, one of the four original New Hampshire townships. To encourage settlement, as early as 1710 Exeter awarded free wood lots in the area. In 1741, Epping was granted a charter and incorporated as a town, the last New Hampshire town chartered by Governor Jonathan Belcher before the Province of New Hampshire was granted a governor who did not also govern the neighboring Province of Massachusetts Bay. Epping was named for Epping, in England.[2]

Following the American Revolution, many residents of the town moved to Monmouth, Maine, when General Henry Dearborn offered free land to his soldiers. Through the 1800s, farming was a principal occupation in Epping. The town also had substantial reserves of clay, long used by local residents to make bricks, and in 1840, the first commercial brickyard was established in Epping.

It was formerly said in jest: "Epping -- the center of the universe." Now, due to its strategic position at the crossroads of Route 101 and Route 125, the community is indeed becoming a retail center, as chain stores locate here. But because the traditional town center is clustered around Route 27, an older road connecting Exeter with Hooksett and Manchester, Epping's antique architectural charm has been spared from redevelopment.

Culture

Epping is home to the Leddy Center, an antique playhouse where local performers present classics such as The Wizard of Oz and Anne of Green Gables. Musical lessons are also offered at this facility.

New England Dragway and Star Speedway are also located in Epping. New England Dragway puts on races and auto displays throughout the year, including the IHRA Amalie Oil North American Nationals. The dragway hosts a popular Halloween display during the second half of October.

An annual canoe race down the Lamprey River occurs on the last weekend in April, and the fire department arranges for Santa to drive through the town atop a fire engine during the winter.

Camp Hedding, the site of a United Methodist campground founded in 1862, is located in the eastern part of town. The ground now hosts an annual camp meeting for one week in August and an "olde time fair" on the first Saturday of August every year.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 26.2 square miles (68 km2), of which 26.0 sq mi (67 km2) is land and 0.2 sq mi (0.52 km2) is water, comprising 0.76% of the town. Epping is drained by the Lamprey and Piscassic rivers. The highest point in Epping is Kennard Hill at 472 feet (144 m) above sea level, located in the town's northwest corner. Epping lies fully within the Piscataqua River (Coastal) watershed.[3]

The town center, defined as a census-designated place (CDP), has a total area of 2.7 square miles (7.0 km2), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the 2000 census, there were 5,476 people, 2,047 households, and 1,473 families residing in the town. The population density was 210.4 persons per square mile (81.2/km²). There were 2,215 housing units at an average density of 85.1 houses per square mile (32.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.08% White, 0.27% African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, and 1.83% from two or more races. 0.77% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,047 households out of which 35.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.7% were married couples living together, 8.5% have a woman whose husband does not live with her, and 28.0% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.12.

Main Street in 1905

In the town the population was spread out with 27.1% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 34.6% from 25 to 44, 22.4% from 45 to 64, and 9.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 97.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.8 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $50,739, and the median income for a family was $54,722. Males had a median income of $40,273 versus $25,440 for females. The per capita income for the town was $21,109. 3.3% of the population and 2.6% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 4.6% are under the age of 18 and 6.1% are 65 or older.

Town center

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,673 people, 703 households, and 440 families residing in the central village, or census-designated place (CDP). The population density was 622.5 people per square mile (240.1/km²). There were 723 housing units at an average density of 103.8 persons/km² (269.0 persons/sq mi). The racial makeup of the town was 97.31% White, 0.30% African American, 0.12% Native American, 0.78% Asian, and 1.49% from two or more races. 0.12% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 703 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.8% were married couples living together, 9.0% have a woman whose husband does not live with her, and 37.4% were non-families. 30.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 23.9% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 21.6% from 45 to 64, and 17.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.3 males.

The median income for a household is $39,417, and the median income for a family was $46,438. Males had a median income of $36,165 versus $24,063 for females. The per capita income for the town was $18,343. 6.7% of the population and 5.6% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 8.6% are under the age of 18 and 11.7% are 65 or older.

Sites of interest

  • Epping Historical Society Museum
  • The Leddy Center
  • New England Dragway

Notable people

References

  1. ^ a b United States Census Bureau, American FactFinder, 2010 Census figures. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  2. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 120. 
  3. ^ Foster, Debra H.; Batorfalvy, Tatianna N.; Medalie, Laura (1995). Water Use in New Hampshire: An Activities Guide for Teachers. U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Geological Survey. 
  • NHES Community Profile: Epping (PDF)
  • Rockingham County Planning Committee - Maps
  • U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Epping, New Hampshire

External links

  • Town of Epping official website
  • Harvey-Mitchell Memorial Library
  • New Hampshire Economic and Labor Market Information Bureau Profile
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