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Foreign relations of Estonia

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Title: Foreign relations of Estonia  
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Subject: Bulgaria–Estonia relations, Estonia–Germany relations, Azerbaijan–Estonia relations, Estonia–Latvia relations, Politics of Estonia
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Foreign relations of Estonia

The Republic of Estonia gained its independence from the Russian Empire on 24 February 1918 and established diplomatic relations with many countries via membership of the League of Nations. The forcible incorporation of Estonia into the Soviet Union in 1940 was not generally recognised by the international community and the Estonian diplomatic service continued to operate in some countries. Following the restoration of independence from the Soviet Union, Russia was one of the first nations to re-recognize Estonia's independence (the first country to do so was Iceland on 22 August 1991). Estonia's immediate priority after regaining its independence was the withdrawal of Russian (formerly Soviet) forces from Estonian territory. In August 1994, this was completed. However, relations with Moscow have remained strained primarily because Russia decided not to ratify the border treaty it had signed with Estonia in 1999.

Trends following re-independence

Since regaining independence, Estonia has pursued a foreign policy of close cooperation with Western European nations.
President George W. Bush, in Estonia 2006.
The two most important policy objectives in this regard have been accession into NATO and the European Union, achieved in March and May 2004 respectively. Estonia's international realignment toward the West has been accompanied by a general deterioration in relations with Russia, most recently demonstrated by the controversy surrounding relocation of the Bronze Soldier WWII memorial in Tallinn.[1] Estonia has become an increasingly strong supporter of deepening European integration. The decision to participate in the preparation of a financial transaction tax in 2012 reflects this shift in Estonia’s EU policy.[2]

An important element in Estonia's post-independence reorientation has been closer ties with the Nordic countries, especially Finland and Sweden. Indeed, Estonians consider themselves a Nordic people due to being Finno-Ugric people like the Finns rather than Balts,[3][4] based on their historical ties with Denmark and particularly Finland and Sweden. In December 1999 Estonian foreign minister (and since 2006, president of Estonia) Toomas Hendrik Ilves delivered a speech entitled "Estonia as a Nordic Country" to the Swedish Institute for International Affairs.[5] In 2003, the foreign ministry also hosted an exhibit called "Estonia: Nordic with a Twist".[6] And in 2005, Estonia joined the European Union's Nordic Battle Group. It has also shown continued interest in becoming a full member in the Nordic Council.

Whereas in 1992 Russia accounted for 92% of Estonia's international trade,[7] today there is extensive economic interdependence between Estonia and its Nordic neighbors: three quarters of foreign investment in Estonia originates in the Nordic countries (principally Finland and Sweden), to which Estonia sends 42% of its exports (as compared to 6.5% going to Russia, 8.8% to Latvia, and 4.7% to Lithuania). On the other hand, the Estonian political system, its flat rate of income tax, and its non-welfare-state model distinguish it from the other Nordic states, and indeed from many other European countries.[8]

Estonia is a party to 181 international organizations, including the WTO.

International disputes

Estonian and Russian negotiators reached a technical border agreement in December 1996. The border treaty was initialed in 1999. On 18 May 2005 Estonian Foreign Minister Urmas Paet and his Russian colleague Sergei Lavrov signed in Moscow the “Treaty between the Government of the Republic of Estonia and the Government of the Russian Federation on the Estonian-Russian border” and the “Treaty between the Government of the Republic of Estonia and the Government of the Russian Federation on the Delimitation of the Maritime Zones in the Gulf of Finland and the Gulf of Narva”. The Riigikogu (Estonian Parliament) ratified the treaties on 20 June 2005 and the President of Estonia Arnold Rüütel announced them on 22 June 2005. On 31 August 2005 Russian President Vladimir Putin gave a written order to the Russian Foreign Ministry to notify the Estonian side of “Russia’s intention not to participate in the border treaties between the Russian Federation and the Republic of Estonia”. On 6 September 2005 the Foreign Ministry of the Russian Federation forwarded a note to Estonia, in which Russia informed that it did not intend to become a party to the border treaties between Estonia and Russia and did not consider itself bound by the circumstances concerning the object and the purposes of the treaties.

Diplomatic relationships

Estonia established diplomatic relations with Kazakhstan on 27 May 1992. Estonia is represented in Kazakhstan through its embassy in Moscow (Russia). Kazakhstan is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Vilnius (Lithuania).

Uruguay was among the countries that refused to recognize the Soviet occupation of the Baltic countries. Uruguay re-recognised Estonia’s independence on 28 August 1991. Estonia and Uruguay established diplomatic relations on 30 September 1992. Estonia is represented in Uruguay through an honorary consulate in Montevideo. Uruguay is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Stockholm (Sweden) and an honorary consulate in Tallinn.[9]

Through diplomatic cooperation with Latvia, Estonia opened an embassy in Cairo, Egypt in March 2010 [10] as settled in an agreement signed by Estonian Foreign Ministry Secretary General Marten Kokk and the Ambassador of the Republic of Latvia Kārlis Eihenbaums on 5 January.

As of February 2012, Estonia has not established diplomatic relations with three countries: North Korea, Sudan, and Burma. Foreign minister Urmas Paet has indicated that after the 2011–2012 Burmese political reforms Estonia is reconsidering its stance in regard to the government in Burma and is now considering establishing formal diplomatic relations.[11]

Relations by country

Country Formal Relations Began Notes
23 August 1992
  • Armenia is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Warsaw (Poland) and an honorary consulate in Tallinn.
  • Estonia is represented in Armenia through its embassy in Athens (Greece) and through an honorary consulate in Yerevan.
  • There are around 2,000 of Armenian descent living in Estonia.[12]
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Armenia
22 September 1921 See Australia–Estonia relations
  • Australia first recognised Estonia on 22 September 1921.
  • Both countries re-established diplomatic relations on 21 November 1991.
  • Australia is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Stockholm (Sweden), and through an honorary consulate in Tallinn.
  • Estonia is represented in Australia through its embassy in Canberra opened 1st January 2015, succeeding a non-resident embassy based in Tokyo (Japan), and through three honorary consulates (in Claremont, Hobart, and two in Sydney).[13]
  • Australia is host to one of the largest communities of Estonians abroad, with 8,232 people identifying as Estonian in the 2006 Australian Census.[14][15]
26 June 1921
  • Austria recognised Estonia on 26 June 1921.
  • Both countries re-established diplomatic relations on 8 January 1992.
  • Austria has an embassy in Tallinn.
  • Estonia has an embassy in Vienna and an honorary consulate in Salzburg.[16]
  • Austrian Ministry of Foreign Affairs: list of bilateral treaties with Estonia (in German only)
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Austria
20 April 1992 See Azerbaijan-Estonia relations
6 April 1992
  • Belarus has a Consulate General in Tallinn.[17]
  • Estonia opened its Consulate General in Minsk on 21 July 1995.[18]
26 January 1921 See Foreign relations of Belgium
20 May 1921 See Bulgaria–Estonia relations
  • Bulgaria recognised Estonia on 20 May 1921 and re-recognised Estonia on 26 August 1991.
  • Bulgaria is represented in Estonia through an honorary consulate in Tallinn.
  • Estonia has an honorary consulate in Sofia.[19]
1922 See Foreign relations of Canada
  • Canada has an embassy office in Tallinn.[20]
  • Estonia has an embassy in Ottawa.[21]
22 September 1921 See Chile–Estonia relations
  • Chile first recognised Estonia on 22 September 1921.
  • Chile re-recognised Estonia on 28 August 1991 and diplomatic relations between the two countries were established on 27 September 1991. Chile is represented in Estonia through its ambassador who resides in Helsinki (Finland) and through an honorary consulate in Tallinn. Estonia is represented in Chile through an honorary consulate in Santiago. The current Chilean ambassador to Estonia, Carlos Parra Merino, officially presented his credentials to the Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves in June 2007[22] Carlos Parra Merino resides in Helsinki.
  • An agreement on visa-free travel between Estonia and Chile came to force in 2 December 2000.[23][24][25] The two countries also have in force a Memorandum on co-operation between the Ministries of Foreign Affairs.[23] Agreements on cultural, tourism, and IT cooperation are being readied.[23]
  • Chile is among Estonia's most important foreign trade partners in South America.[26]
  • In 2007, trade between Estonia and Chile was valued at 6.3 million EUR. Estonian exports included mainly machinery, mechanical equipment, and mineral fuels; Chile exports included mainly wine, fish, crustaceans and fruit. In 2004, 83% of Chile exports to Estonia, then totaling 2.4 million EUR, consisted of wine.[23] In 2008, Chilean wines held the highest share of Estonia's imported wine market, followed by Spanish wines.[27] Due to its climate being unsuitable for large-scale grape production, most wine sold in Estonia is imported.
  • In 2006, Estonia and Chile issued the joint Antarctic themed stamp series, designed by Ülle Marks and Jüri Kass, bearing images of the Emperor penguin and the minke whale.[28] The works of Chilean writers Isabel Allende, Pablo Neruda and José Donoso have been translated into Estonian.[23]
11 September 1991 See Foreign relations of the People's Republic of China
22 September 1921
  • Colombia first recognised Estonia on 22 September 1921 and re-recognised the restored Republic of Estonia on 23 March 1994.
  • Colombia is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Warsaw (Poland).
  • Estonia is represented in Colombia through its embassy in Brasilia (Brazil).
  • Colombia defines Estonia as a major ally and key player on Colombia's accession into the OECD and ratification of the Colombia-European Union Trade Agreement.[29]
2 March 1992 See Croatia–Estonia relations
  • Estonia has an embassy in Budapest, Hungary which serves to represent the country in Croatia.
  • Croatia has an embassy in Helsinki, Finland which serves to represent the country in Estonia.
  • In 2000 the two countries mutually ended the visa regimes for citizens travelling between the two states.[30] In September 2008, the Estonian prime minister Andrus Ansip made a state visit to Croatia in which he supported the country on its way toward NATO and EU membership.[31]
  • Croatian Ministry of Foreign Affaires and European Integration: list of bilateral treaties with Estonia
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the relation with Croatia
See Foreign relations of Cyprus
See Foreign relations of the Czech Republic
1921 See Denmark–Estonia relations
1937
20 June 1920 See Estonia–Finland relations
26 January 1921
  • France recognised Estonia on 26 January 1921. France never recognised Soviet occupation of Estonia. France re-stated its recognition on 25 August 1991.
  • Estonia has an embassy in Paris and 4 honorary consulates (in Lille, Lyon, Nancy and Toulouse).[34]
  • France has an embassy in Tallinn.[35]
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with France
  • French Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Estonia
17 June 1992
  • Georgia recognised the restored Republic of Estonia on 27 August 1991.
  • Since July 2006, Estonia has an embassy in Tbilisi.
  • Since April 2007, Georgia has an embassy in Tallinn.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Georgia
  • Georgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Estonia
19 May 1922
  • Greece recognised Estonia on 19 May 1922. Greece never recognised the Soviet annexation of Estonia.
  • In April 1997, Estonia has established an embassy in Athens.
  • The Greek embassy in Tallinn opened in January 2005.
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and the European Union.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Greece
  • Greek Foreign Affairs Ministry about relations with Estonia
10 October 1921
  • Estonia is represented in the Vatican through a non resident ambassador a based in Tallinn (in the Foreign Ministry).[36]
  • The Holy See is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Vilnius (Lithuania).[37]
  • In September 1993, Pope John Paul II visited Estonia.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the bilateral relations with the Vatican
24 February 1921
  • Hungary recognised Estonia on 24 February 1921.
  • Estonia has an embassy and an honorary consulate in Budapest.[38]
  • Hungary has an embassy in Tallinn and two honorary consulates (in Tallinn and Tartu).[39]
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • Estonia Ministry of Foreign affairs about relations with Hungary
30 January 1922
  • Iceland was the first country to re-recognised Estonia's independence on 22 August 1991.
  • According to Lennart Meri "Iceland has a great role in changing the world in 1991 as an icebreaker, because Iceland reminded everyone of lost values".
  • Estonia is represented in Iceland through its embassy in Oslo (Norway) and an honorary consulate in Reykjavík.
  • Iceland is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Helsinki (Finland).[40]
  • Both countries are full members of NATO, of the Council of Europe and of the Council of the Baltic Sea States.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the relation with Iceland
22 September 1921 See Estonia–India relations
  • India first recognised Estonia on 22 September 1921.
  • India re-recognised Estonia on 9 September 1991.
  • Estonia is represented in India by two honorary consulates (in Mumbai and New Delhi).
  • India is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Helsinki (Finland) and through an honorary consulate in Tallinn.
27 August 1991
  • Ireland recognised Estonia on 27 August 1991.
  • Estonia has an embassy in Dublin.
  • Ireland has an embassy in Tallinn.
  • Both countries are full members of the European Union.
  • There are around 2,400 Estonians living in Ireland.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Ireland
9 January 1992
  • Israel recognised Estonia on 4 September 1991.
  • Estonia is represented in Israel by a non resident ambassador based in Tallinn (in the Foreign Ministry).
  • Israel is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Helsinki (Finland).[41]
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the relation with Israel
26 January 1921
  • Italy recognised Estonia on 26 January 1921 . Italy re-recognised Estonia on 27 August 1991.
  • Estonia has an embassy in Rome and six honorary consulates (in Cagliari, Florence, Genoa, Milan, Naples and Turin).[42]
  • Italy has an embassy in Tallinn.[43]
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the relation with Italy
26 January 1921
  • The Estonian embassy in Tokyo was built in 1996.[44]
  • The Japanese embassy in Tallinn in 1993.[45]
  • Japan has financed several smaller projects in Estonia related to culture and education.[46]
  • Estionian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Japan
  • Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Estonia
24 April 2008
3 December 1918 See Estonia–Latvia relations
  • Estonia has an embassy in Riga.
  • Latvia has an embassy in Tallinn.
  • The two states share 343 km of common borders.
  • They enjoy close relations sharing a common history of relations in the USSR and being neighbours.[47]
1919
  • Estonia has an embassy in Vilnius.[48]
  • Lithuania has an embassy in Tallinn.[49]
  • The Estonian ambassador to Lithuania is Andres Tropp.
  • Both countries are situated in the Baltic region and are the full members of NATO and EU.
22 February 1923
  • Luxembourg recognised Estonia on 22 February 1923 and re-recognised Estonia on 27 August 1991.[23] Both countries re-established diplomatic relations on 29 August 1991.[23] Estonia is represented in Luxembourg through its embassy in Brussels (Belgium) and an honorary consulate in Luxembourg.[23] Luxembourg is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Prague (Czech Republic).[23] As of 31 December 2007 foreign investments made in Estonia originating from Luxembourg totaled 225 million EUR accounting for 2% of the total volume of foreign direct investments. Luxembourg took 10th place in the general ranking of the countries. Investments from Luxembourg were made primarily in real estate rental and business activity (46%), wholesale and retail trade (34%), and financial intermediation (15%). The rest were made in the transportation and communication sector and the manufacturing industry. As of the same date, Estonian direct investments in Luxembourg totaled 1.1 million EUR, and were mostly made in the financial and real estate sectors.[23] There are about 300 Estonians living in Luxembourg.[23]
  • Trade agreement between Estonia and Belgium and Luxembourg (1935)[50]
  • Agreement on Road Transport between Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands (came into force 1.12.94)[51]
  • Agreement Between Estonia and the Belgo-Luxembourg Economic Union on the Reciprocal Promotion and Protection of Investments (came into force 23 September 1999)[52]
  • Agreement Between Estonia and the States of Benelux on Readmission of Persons (came into force 1.02.05)
  • Agreement on the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Income and Capital Tax evasion (signed 23 May 2006)[53][54]
4 November 1993 See Foreign relations of Malaysia
1 January 1992
  • Malta recognised Estonia on 26 August 1991.
  • Estonia is represented in Malta through its embassy in Rome (Italy).[59]
  • Malta is represented in Estonia through a non resident embassy based in Valletta (in the Foreign Affairs Ministry) and through an honorary consulate in Tallinn.[60]
  • Both countries are full members of the European Union.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Malta
28 January 1937
  • Mexico and Estonia signed a friendship treaty on 28 January 1937.
  • Mexico was among those countries that never recognized Estonia's annexation by the Soviet Union. Mexico recognized the restored Republic of Estonia on 5 September 1991, while diplomatic relations were re-established on 5 December 1991.[61]
  • Estonia is accredited to Mexico from its embassy in Washington, DC and has an honorary consulate in Mexico City and in Tampico.[62]
  • Mexico is accredited to Estonia from its embassy in Helsinki and has an honorary consulate in Tallinn.[63]
10 November 1992
  • Moldova recognised Estonia on 28 August 1991 and Estonia recognised Moldova on 20 February 1992.
  • Estonia is represented in Moldova through its embassy in Kiev (Ukraine) and through an honorary consulate in Chişinău.
  • Moldova has an embassy in Tallinn.
  • Both countries are full members of the Council of Europe.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the relation with Moldova
  • Moldovan Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the relation with Estonia
5 March 1921
  • The Netherlands recognised Estonia on 5 March 1921. After the end of Soviet occupation the Netherlands re-recognised Estonia on 2 September 1991.
  • Estonia has an embassy in The Hague and two honorary consulates (in Curaçao and Rotterdam).[65]
  • The Netherlands have an embassy in Tallinn.[66]
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with the Netherlands
  • Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the relation with Estonia (in Dutch only)
5 February 1921
See Foreign relations of North Korea
31 December 1920
6 February 1921
  • Portugal recognised Estonia de facto in 1918 and de jure on 6 February 1921. Portugal never recognised the occupation of Estonia by the Soviet Union.
  • Portugal re-recognised the Republic of Estonia on 27 August 1991.
  • Estonia has an embassy in Lisbon and two honorary consualtes (in Porto and Tavira).[71][72]
  • Portugal has an embassy in Tallinn.
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Portugal
26 February 1921
  • Romania recognised Estonia's independence on 26 February 1921.
  • Estonia is represented in Romania through its embassy in Warsaw (Poland). Estonia plans on opening an honorary consulate in Bucharest in the coming years.
  • Romania is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Helsinki (Finland) and an honorary consulate in Tallinn.[73]
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Romania
  • Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Estonia
2 February 1920 See Estonia–Russia relations and Chechen–Estonia relations Russia recognised Estonia via the Tartu Peace Treaty on the 2nd of February, 1920. Russian-Estonian relations were re-established in January 1991, when the presidents Boris Yeltsin of RSFSR and Arnold Rüütel of the Republic of Estonia met in Tallinn and signed a treaty governing the relations of the two countries after the anticipated independence of Estonia from the Soviet Union.[74][75] The treaty guaranteed the right to freely choose their citizenship for all residents of the former Estonian SSR. Russia re-recognised the Republic of Estonia on 24 August 1991 after the failed Soviet coup attempt, as one of the first countries to do so. The Soviet Union recognised the independence of Estonia on 6 September. Estonia's ties with Boris Yeltsin weakened since the Russian leader's initial show of solidarity with the Baltic states in January 1991. Issues surrounding the withdrawal of Russian troops from the Baltic republics and Estonia's denial of automatic citizenship to persons who settled in Estonia in 1941-1991 and well offspring[76] ranked high on the list of points of contention.
9 February 2001
  • Estonia is represented in Serbia through a non-resident ambassador based in Tallinn (in the Foreign Ministry).
  • Serbia is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Helsinki (Finland).
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Serbia
  • Serbian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Estonia
30 March 1993
  • Estonia recognised Slovakia on 15 January 1993.
  • Estonia is represented in Slovakia through its embassy in Vienna (Austria).
  • Slovakia is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Riga (Latvia) and an honorary consulate in Tallinn.
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Slovakia
17 September 1991 See Estonia – South Korea relations
25 March 1921
  • Spain recognised Estonia in 1921. Spain renewed its recognition of Estonia on 27 August 1991.
  • Estonia has an embassy in Madrid and two honorary consulates (in Barcelona and Sevilla).[79][80]
  • Spain has an embassy and an honorary consulate in Tallinn.[81]
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the relation with Spain
  • Spanish Ministry of Foreign Relations about the relation with Estonia (in Spanish only)
31 January 1996 See Estonia – Sri Lanka relations
  • Sri Lanka recognised Estonia on 10 October 1991.
  • Sri Lanka has an embassy in Stockholm which serves Estonia.
  • Estonia has no embassy for Sri Lanka.
  • Economic relations between Sri Lanka and Estonia are at moderate level.
See Estonia–Sweden relations
  • Estonia was under Swedish rule between 1561 and 1721.
  • Sweden re-recognised Estonia on 27 August 1991.
  • Estonia has an embassy in Stockholm and five honorary consulates (in Eskilstuna, Gothenburg, Karlskrona, Malmö and Visby).
  • Sweden has an embassy in Tallinn and two honorary consulates (in Narva and Tartu).
22 October 1921 See Foreign relations of Thailand
  • Thailand (then Siam) first recognised Estonia on 22 October 1921.[82]
  • Both countries re-established diplomatic relations on 27 April 1992.
  • Thailand is represented in Estonia through its embassy in Stockholm (Sweden).
  • Estonia is represented in Thailand through its consulates in Bangkok and Phuket.[83]
13 March 2015
  • Both countries established diplomatic relations on 13 March 2015.[84]
4 January 1992
5 February 1921
22 July 1922 See Estonia–United States relations

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^ Estonian foreign ministry publication, 2004
  4. ^ Estonian foreign ministry publication, 2002
  5. ^ NATO :: NATO :: Estonia as a Nordic Country
  6. ^ Estonia - Nordic with a Twist
  7. ^
  8. ^ http://www.investinestonia.com/pdf/ForeignTrade2007.pdf Foreign investment
  9. ^ Estonia and Uruguay
  10. ^ Foreign Minister Urmas Paet Opened Estonian Embassy in Egypt
  11. ^ "Millise kahe riigiga pole Eestil diplomaatilisi suhteid?" Postimees 1. march 2012.
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^ Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Australia
  16. ^
  17. ^
  18. ^ Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Belarus
  19. ^ Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Bulgaria
  20. ^ Office of the embassy of Canada in Tallinn
  21. ^ Embassy of Estonia in Ottawa
  22. ^ The Estonian President received credentials from the Ambassador of Chile
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs: Estonia and Chile
  24. ^ Elektrooniline Riigi Teataja: Eesti Vabariigi valitsuse ja Tšiili Vabariigi valitsuse vaheline turistide viisakohustuse kaotamise kokkulepe
  25. ^
  26. ^ Estonian Cabinet of Ministers: Prime Minister spoke with the President of Chile about the common interests of both states
  27. ^ Ärileht 4 December 2008 15:21: Eesti tarbija eelistab Hispaania ja Tšiili veine
  28. ^ Õhtuleht Eesti ja Tšiili ühine postmark, 25 October 2006
  29. ^
  30. ^
  31. ^
  32. ^ Egyptian embassy in Helsinki (also accredited to Estonia)
  33. ^
  34. ^
  35. ^
  36. ^ Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs: direction of the Estonian ambassador to the Vatican
  37. ^ Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs: direction of the Vatican embassy in Vilnius (also accredited to Estonia)
  38. ^ Estonian embassy in Budapest
  39. ^ Hungarian embassy in Tallinn
  40. ^
  41. ^
  42. ^
  43. ^ Italian embassy in Tallinn
  44. ^
  45. ^ Japanese embassy in Tallinn
  46. ^
  47. ^ Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Latvia
  48. ^ (Estonian) (Lithuanian) (English) Embassy of the Republic of Estonia in the Republic of Lithuania
  49. ^ (English) Embassy of the Republic of Lithuania in the Republic of Estonia
  50. ^
  51. ^
  52. ^ Text of the Agreement Between Estonia and the Belgo-Luxembourg Economic Union on the Reciprocal Promotion and Protection of Investments.
  53. ^
  54. ^
  55. ^
  56. ^
  57. ^
  58. ^ a b c
  59. ^
  60. ^
  61. ^ Estonia and Mexico
  62. ^ Embassy of Estonia in Washington, DC accredited to Mexico
  63. ^ Ministry of foreign affairs of Estonia: Mexico
  64. ^
  65. ^
  66. ^ Dutch embassy in Tallinn
  67. ^
  68. ^
  69. ^
  70. ^
  71. ^
  72. ^ Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs: direction of the Estonian honorary consulates in Portugal
  73. ^
  74. ^ Kristina Kallas, Eesti Vabariigi ja Vene Föderatsiooni riikidevahelised läbirääkimised aastatel 1990–1994 - Tartu 2000
  75. ^ Eesti Ekspress: Ta astus sajandist pikema sammu - Boriss Jeltsin 1931-2007, 25 April 2007
  76. ^ Citizenship Act of Estonia (§ 5. Acquisition of Estonian citizenship by birth): [1]
  77. ^ Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with South Korea
  78. ^ http://www.mofa.go.kr/ENG/countries/europe/countries/20070818/1_24628.jsp?menu=m_30_40
  79. ^
  80. ^ Estonian Ministry of Foreign Affairs: direction of the Estonian honorary consulates in Spain
  81. ^ Spanish embassy in Tallinn (in Spanish only)
  82. ^ Estonian and Thaiand
  83. ^ EU Countries not Represented in Thaiand
  84. ^
  85. ^
  86. ^
  87. ^
  88. ^
  89. ^
  90. ^
  91. ^ Embassy of Estonia in Washington, DC
  92. ^ Embassy of the United States in Tallinn
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